Tag Archives: Italeri

Italeri 1/72 AH-64D (080) Build Review

One thing I noticed when I began this build (and which I missed in the In-Box Review) is that there are two sprues here, but though they are completely different, both are identified as “080 A”, moulded into a tab on the sprue. The instructions refer to them as A and B. This isn’t by any means a major problem, but it does perhaps indicate a certain carelessness in the making of the moulds for this kit.  As you follow this build, you’ll realise that this isn’t the only issue with these parts…

Anyway, I start on this kit by attempting to improve the shape of the rear of the fuselage sponsons. These are completely the wrong shape so I start by cutting off the rear of the existing sponson.

Then, I create a new rear part of the sponson using plastic card and filler. The result certainly isn’t perfect, but I believe it is closer than the kit version.

Next I work on the cockpit tub. No real problems here and I don’t spend a great deal of time on detail given that this is obviously the wrong cockpit for this model of AH-64. The seats are a problem. They include harness shoulder straps, which is nice. But they also have distinct ejector pin marks right in the centre of the rear seat cushion, right between the straps. If you sand off the pin marks, you’ll lose the strap detail…

Before I join the fuselage halves, I check the fit of the cockpit, and I’m glad I do because it’s around 2mm short.

In the image below, you can also see just how bad fit between the fuselage halves is – look at the area in front of the cockpit and the mounting hole for the upper sensor module… I use filler to build up the front edge of the cockpit in the hope that this will help to hide the gap.

Then, I join the fuselage halves. Fit, frankly, is horrible. There are locating pins, but even using these as guides, the two halves just don’t match up – this is especially noticeable on the top of the nose, ahead of the cockpit. After lots of sanding and the use of a fair amount of filler, I end up with a fairly smooth join, but of course I lose all the raised panel lines and rivet detail in the areas where I have sanded the joins.

Then I assemble the halves of the engine pods. Again, these have locating pins and again, the top and bottom halves just don’t line up. This leaves a very noticeable seam between the halves. I’m going to sand and fill to remove this, but this also means that I’ll be removing virtually all the detail from the outside of the pods. Just take a look at the image below (and yes, I have used the locating pegs and holes to line the pod halves up). I really can’t remember the last time that I dealt with this level of fit issue, though I suspect it was around 1972… 

After a great deal of filling and sanding, I end up with engine pods that look just about OK, though as you can see, they now lack surface detail on the outside. I have also added the undercarriage and the horizontal stabilator, which is tricky to fit straight.

I go on to add other bits and pieces to the fuselage, including the canopy and the underwing stores. I used filler to build up the fuselage ahead of the canopy, but more was needed at the rear of the canopy to cover a small gap. In addition, the Hellfire missiles really don’t look anything like the originals and the endcaps for the Hydra rocket pods fit badly – lots of sanding and filling is required to get smooth cylinders.

Final construction of the fuselage is completed and happily, I don’t encounter any further serious fit problems. I also construct the rotor head, blades and Longbow radar and these go together precisely and  with no problems at all – hurrah! These are temporarily fitted, but I’ll be leaving them off until painting is finished. I also Ieave off a couple of small antenna that don’t seem to appear on operational versions of the AH-64D – I guess that these were perhaps unique to the prototype? As you can guess, I haven’t enjoyed this build at all but now, finally, I’m ready to start painting.

Masking the cockpit is less of a problem than it can be simply because the canopy comprises mainly large, flat panels. I go for several thinned coats of Vallejo Russian Uniform for the base coat. The instructions suggest olive drab, but I’m going for a British Army Air Corps version and these seem to be a lighter green (and current US Army AH-64s are painted grey, not green). I add some highlights and pick out details like the sensor panels and hydra rocket heads in a light grey and add the decals.

Finally it gets a grey oil wash to pick out details and make the whole thing look well-used. Most images of operational AH-64s show them with blotchy, discoloured and chipped paint. With that done, this Italeri AH-64 is finally finished. One thing I’m particularly disappointed about on the finished kit is that the pilot’s control panel is clearly visible, and is equally clearly the wrong panel for this model of AH-64.

After Action Report

If you want to build a small scale AH-64, buy one of the Academy kits. Or anything else at all rather than this, the kit that time forgot. I have read in other reviews that fit on this kit is “indifferent.” I disagree. Fit is only indifferent in the good parts. In many places, it’s utter crap. You’ll be left with the choice of leaving very visible seams, or sanding and filling which will remove much of the raised surface detail. Some parts, such as the cockpit, just don’t fit the opening in the fuselage.

I had initially thought of adding some detail here. The M230 chain gun, for example, lacks the distinctive protective cage fitted on all Apaches and the Hellfire missiles used by the British Army have distinctive markings for which decals are not provided. But really, I couldn’t be bothered given all the other problems I encountered here. By the time I finished just building this kit, I was losing the will to live…

I had been really looking forward to building an aviation subject for the first time in a number of years before I began this build but, as a wise man once said: “This is no fun, no fun at all.*” I’m not normally a giver-upper, but I really struggled to find the enthusiasm to finish this build. I have built some old kits since I re-started kit-building a few years back, but I haven’t come across anything quite this bad. Almost every single step of the build involved dealing with deficiencies in fit and mouldings that just don’t match.

Does crap fit and a lack of accuracy make you feel nostalgic for the kits you built as a kid? If so, you might, possibly, enjoy this one. Otherwise, I can’t think of any reason why you’d waste your money on this piece of shoddy tat. Avoid at all costs!

* If you care, it was Johnny Rotten, at the Sex Pistol’s last gig in San Francisco in 1978.

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Italeri 1/72 AH-64D (080) In-Box Review and History

Italeri 1/72 AH-64D (080) In-Box Review and History

Observant readers will already have noticed that this isn’t a review of a tank or AFV kit. When I first got interested in kit-building back in the early 1970s, I mainly built 1/72 scale aircraft. So, this is a bit of nostalgia for me and hey, it’s a kind of flying tank, so I feel that it does sort of fit here…

I first encountered the AH-64 back in the early 2000s. For more than twenty years, I lived with my family in a remote glen in the Scottish Highlands. It was a great place for aircraft spotting, being part of an RAF low-flying training area (I recall watching one RAF Jaguar flying so low over a remote loch that it left a boat-like wake on the placid waters…). Late one night, I was walking my dogs in the forest near my home. It was dark, but there was an almost full moon, so I didn’t need my head-torch. Then, I heard something strange approaching…

It wasn’t a jet, it sounded too slow and low to be a piston-engine aircraft and it lacked the characteristic “whop, whop” of a helicopter. This was a low growl that seemed to be heading my way. I watched in amazement as two squat, angular helicopters appeared, flying just a couple of hundred feet above the trees and visible only because they were silhouetted against the moonlit sky. That was the first time I ever saw an AH-64 (though I guess these were probably the version used by the British Army, the WAH-64) and I was well-impressed.

However, I have never attempted a kit of this classic attack helicopter. So when I saw this Italeri kit on special offer, I couldn’t resist. It was first released back in 1987 as the AH-64 and then updated in 1991 to portray the AH-64D version. Given that the basic elements of this kit are now well over thirty years old, is it any good?

History

The notion of the attack helicopter really emerged during the conflict in Vietnam. A new version of the iconic Bell UH-1 Iroquois transport helicopter (more often known as the Huey) was created with an entirely new fuselage which lacked a cargo bay and had seats for just a pilot and gunner. In the mid-1970s, Hughes Helicopters began work on an entirely new aircraft, the Type 77. The first prototype flew in 1975 and by 1986, the design had been designated AH-64 Apache and was entering service with the US Armed Forces. By that time, Hughes Helicopters had been bought over by McDonnel-Douglas and from 1997, Boeing Defense, Space & Security took over production so this is now generally referred to as the Boeing AH-64.

An AH-1 Cobra, one of the first attack helicopters.

This one tough helicopter. The pilot and CPG/Gunner sit in a bathtub constructed of Kevlar armour and separated by a plexiglass blast shield. All important systems include redundancy, so the AH-64 can keep flying with significant damage. On the original version, a Martin Marietta TADS/PNVS targeting and night vision navigation system was combined with the Honeywell helmet-mounted day/night gunsight and a McDonnell Douglas/Bell mast-mounted day/night target tracking sight to allow target acquisition and tracking day or night.

An early AH-64

Armament comprises an M230 chain gun carried under the nose and AGM-114 Hellfire missiles and Hydra 70 rocket pods on hardpoints under the stub wings. From 1997, the AH-64D added a large radar dome over the rotor mast housing an AN/APG-78 Longbow fire-control radar (FCR) target acquisition system. The D version also introduced a new “glass” cockpit featuring several Multi-Function Displays (MFDs). The Longbow radar allowed the acquisition and simultaneous tracking of up 128 ground targets. After the introduction of the D version, the original (non-radar equipped) Apaches were retrospectively designated AH-64A.

A WAH-64D, a version provided with Rolls-Royce engines and operated by the British Army Air Corps, not the Royal Army

A single AH-64D can pop-up from behind dover, exposing only its radar dome for a few seconds. It can then drop back behind cover and fire Hellfire missiles at up to 8 of those targets. A secure data link can share radar data and allow other AH-64Ds which remain behind cover to engage these same targets.  This is a devastating tank-killer.

A US Army AH-64 escorts a UH-60 Black Hawk in Iraq.

The AH-64 has been used in combat by US forces in Operation Just Cause in Panama, and in Kuwait, Iraq and Afghanistan during the first and second Gulf Wars and during the NATO intervention in the former Yugoslavia in 1999. The British version of this helicopter, the WAH-64, has been used extensively to support British Army operations in Afghanistan.

What’s in the Box?

In the side-opening box you’ll find two sprues moulded in dark green plastic and a single transparent sprue.

The transparent canopy is admirably clear, but the cockpit framing isn’t particularly well-defined, which will make masking and painting tricky. The quality of mouldings and detail are variable and there is some flash. All panels lines are raised and rivets look a little oversize.

Some things, like the rotor head for example, are very nicely moulded and detailed.   

On the other hand, the M230 chain gun is quite crude and lacks detail.

The biggest visual problem here concerns the shape of the sponsons on either side of the fuselage. The rear part on both sides is based on the very first AH-64D prototype (which is probably unsurprising given that this kit was released back in 1991). You can see an image of the prototype AH-64D and the kit fuselage below.

On all operational versions of this helicopter, the rear of the sponsons are a quite different shape. Strangely, the side views in the instructions show the sponsons as provided, but the colour side views on the back of the box show the correct shape for the left-side sponson. Why? You can see what the rear of the sponson should actually look like on the image below.

You can either accept that what you’re building is a model of the prototype (though the markings provided aren’t suitable for that) or you will have to do some work to re-shape the rear of both sponsons if you want to portray an operational version.

Decals and colour schemes are provided for three Apaches covering the US Army, the Dutch Army and for a WAH-64D of the “Royal Army.” I presume this last is a reference the British Army Air Corps. I mean, really, there is no such thing as the Royal Army. How much (or how little) research would it have taken for Italeri to discover that? I think this tells you just how much care and attention went into creating this kit. No decals are provided for the prototype AH-64D, though that’s what is shown on the box-art.  

The instructions seem adequate, though they do contain at least one error: Step 4 shows the sensor modules in the nose being fitted upside down – fortunately, the box art shows the correct orientation.   

Would You Want One?

Overall, this is a mix of good and rather shoddy. It feels like a kit produced in haste, but given that it was released all the way back in 1991, you might have hoped that it would have been sorted out by now. Some of the detail (the rotor head, for example) is very nicely done but raised panel lines aren’t something you’d expect to find on a modern kit and this lacks a lot of details seen on operational Apaches. This also has some fairly serious errors in terms of representing an AH-64D. Most noticeable are the sponsons which I have already discussed.

The second issue is the cockpit: the cockpit control panels provided here are the “steam gauge” version from the earlier AH-64 kit and they lack the distinctive MFDs provided in both front and rear cockpits on the AH-64D. Personally, I can probably live with that: on a 1/72 kit with a closed cockpit, you won’t be able to see much of the control  panels. In many ways, this reminds me of the aircraft kits I struggled with in back in the 1970s – it certainly doesn’t feel like a kit from the 1990s. I like a challenge and I enjoy trying to improve old kits, so I’ll have a go at trying to make this kit into a reasonable representation of the operational AH-64D. You may feel differently, and if you do, there are alternatives in 1/72.

The best of the rest are any of the Academy 1/72 AH-64D kits. These were first released in 2015 and all are accurate, have lots of detail and engraved panel lines. Hasegawa also do an AH-64D in 1/72, but like this Italeri kit, it uses elements from an original AH-64A kit from 1983 and it’s not particularly accurate. Hobby Boss also offer an AH-64D in 1/72, first released in 2007, but it has the same issue with the rear sponsons as this version.

For such an iconic and widely used combat helicopter, it’s surprizing to me that so many available small-scale kits (other than those by Academy) have glaring accuracy issues. If this was a kit featuring, for example, a significant tank from World War Two which had equivalent accuracy issues, I suspect if would be the subject of howls of derision. When I work on modern tank kits, I’m often impressed by the level of detail  and accuracy provided. This on the other hand feels like a throwback to an earlier era when, if something kinda, sorta looked like the original, that was generally good enough. It will be interesting to find out whether this can be built into something that looks acceptable but, out of the box, this appears to have some serious problems.    

Related PostsItaleri 1/72 AH-64D (080) Build Review – coming soon

Italeri 1/72 Autoblinda AB 43 (7052) In-Box Review and History

It’s nice to see that Italian manufacturer Italeri aren’t shy about producing kits of some fairly obscure vehicles. Probably less than one hundred examples of this armoured car were produced and none were actually used by the Italian armed forces during World War Two. I rather like that approach: I do get tired kits of the same old AFVs and it’s refreshing to find a kit of something I have never even heard of.

Italeri also offer a kit of the earlier (and much more widely used) AB 41 and even one of the truly odd AB 40 Ferroviaria, a small armoured car designed to run on railway lines. The AB 43 kit was released in 2008 following the release a couple of years earlier of a 1/35 version of the same vehicle by Italeri.

So it’s Italian, it’s obscure and it appears to have a fiendishly difficult paint scheme. What could possibly go wrong? Let’s find out…

History

In 1937 the Italian Ministry of War invited tenders for a new armoured car (autoblindomitragliatrice). This vehicle was to be suitable for use by both police forces and as a reconnaissance vehicle to be used by tank units. Fiat-Ansaldo presented a proposal for a four-wheeled vehicle with four-wheel drive, four wheel steering and front and rear driving positions. The main armament was a pair of 8mm machine guns mounted in a fully rotating turret. This proposal was accepted and entered service as the AB 40.

The AB 40.

However, only around 25 were produced before an improved version armed with a Breda 20 mm autocannon was released as the AB 41. This would be the most widely produced version of this vehicle with over 400 hundred made which saw service in North Africa, the Balkans, Hungary and even with Italian units on the eastern front.

An AB 41 in North Africa.

In 1942 a specification was released for a new vehicle based on the AB 41. This was to incorporate a more powerful engine and was initially intended to be armed with a 47mm main gun. The dual steering positions were to be dropped, reducing the crew to three and armour was thickened and more steeply sloped at the front. A single prototype of the AB 42 was produced before the Italian army lost interest.

An AB 43 (left) and an AB 41 (right). The main visible differences are a lower turret and more steeply angled front hull armour on the AB 43.

After Italy agreed an armistice with the Allies in 1943, German engineers saw the prototype AB 42 and 100 of these vehicles were ordered for use by the Wehrmacht. Around 100 were manufactured as the Beute Panzerspähwagen AB43 203(i). These used a lower and wider version of the turret from the AB 41, though it was still armed with the 20mm autocannon.    

One of the notable features of the AB 43 is clearly visible in this photograph taken in Belgrade in 1944. The spare wheels were carried low and on mountings that allowed them to rotate, enabling these spare wheels to help the vehicle cross uneven ground.

These armoured cars were used by several German units in Italy and the Balkans during World War Two. After the war, a number of AB 43s were used by Italian police and Carabineri units.

A beautifully restored AB 43 pictured at a display in Rome in 2008. This shows nicely the unique  camo scheme used by German AB 43s but oddly, it lacks German markings.

What’s in the Box?

All the parts are provided on a single sprue moulded in light brown plastic.

Surface and rivet detail look reasonable overall.

The wheels and tyres are moulded separately and the wheels even include appropriate SPA (Società Piemontese Automobili) logos in the centre.

The front and rear visors and the top and rear turret hatches are separate parts that can be shown open. Some interior detail is included for the turret, such as the breech for the 20mm autocannon and the hatches themselves include interior detail.

Overall, the mouldings here look sharp and nicely detailed. This kit doesn’t use slide moulding so the main cannon is not open. It’s so small that drilling doesn’t look possible – you’ll need a drill of 0.3mm and the barrel on this weapon had thin walls, so a very steady hand will be required.

I’d like to be able to show you the decals at this point in the review, but I can’t. Though the box itself and the plastic bag containing the single sprue were both sealed when they arrived, no decals were included. I contacted Italeri Customer support who replied promptly to tell that these decals may be available, and that they will be sent out (taking 3-4 weeks) if I pay “around €6.”  Now, perhaps I’m just a parsimonious, grumpy old Scotsman (actually, there is no doubt about it, I am a parsimonious, grumpy old Scotsman) but I must confess that this doesn’t seem very impressive. OK, I know, €6 isn’t a great deal of money, though it does represent more than half of what this kit cost me on Amazon. What irritates me is that this is for something that should have been included in the first place. Should I really have to pay for that? I don’t think so. I won’t be taking up Italeri’s offer and instead I’ll be using bits and pieces out of my decal spares box here. 

The instructions seem clear though, oddly, there is no mention of where to place part 12, the rear visor. Happily it isn’t too difficult to see where this belongs (it goes on the upper rear hull, if you’re wondering).

Three suggested colour schemes are provided on the rear of the box and in the instructions, Two are for vehicles in late-war German service featuring a complex three-colour camo scheme and one in overall red-brown is for an AB 43 used by the Italian State Police in the 1950s.

Would you want one?

In the box, this looks pretty good. The mouldings are sharp and the surface detail looks acceptable and it even has some interior detail, very unusual at this scale. Perhaps it would have been nice if a siren on the turret roof was provided for the State Police version (these usually seem to have been fitted) but overall, this looks like an accurate representation of this little-known AFV. If I have one reservation, it’s that the spare wheels seem to sit a little too high on the sides of the hull. If you look at the photos in the History section above and compare them with the side view showing the colour schemes, which accurately reflects what the kit looks like, I think you’ll see what I mean.

Obviously, the lack of decals is a pain but I assume that I was simply unlucky and that this isn’t a common issue. And if you do want to build a small-scale AB 43 and you don’t fancy this one, then I’m afraid you’re out of luck. As far as I know, no other manufacturer covers this vehicle in 1/72 or 1/76. Italian company DOC Models did offer a 1/72 version of the similar AB 41, but that was always produced on a small scale and I’m not certain that it’s still available.

Don’t be fooled – this may say Tamiya on the box, but it is actually the Italeri 1/35 kit.

Italeri offer the same kit in 1/35 form (6451), and it seems to be pretty good. It includes soft vinyl tyres, separate armoured headlight covers and all crew and engine access hatches are separate parts that can be shown open (though no engine detail is included). Decals and paint schemes are provided for the same three vehicles depicted in the 1/72 version. Tamiya also released a 1/35 version of the AB 43 in 2008 (89697), but, unusually for Tamiya, this is simply a re-box of the Italeri kit with the addition of two German crew figures originally included with the 1994 Tamiya Panther Ausf. G.   

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Italeri 1/72 Autoblinda AB 43 (7052) Build Review – coming soon

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Italeri 1/35 SdKfz 139 Panzerjäger Marder III (6210) In-Box Review and History

Introduction

It’s been some time since the last post here on Model Kit World, but then as most of you probably know, real life has a way of getting in the way of the really important stuff like building old model kits. But now it’s winter again, the nights are getting distinctly chilly and I have managed to find some time for kit-building again – hurrah! Anyway, time for another review, and this time it’s the 1/35 Marder III from Italian manufacturers Italeri. 

Italeri was founded in 1962 by two young Italian friends, Giuliano Malservisi and  Gian Pietro Parmeggiani. Both loved building kits of aircraft and military vehicles and they decided to start their own company to produce high-quality plastic kits. They founded the company near the city of Bologna and their first kit, a 1/72 Fiat G-55, was released in 1968 under the brand name Airplast, but the company soon rebranded itself, first as Italaerei and then in the 1980s as Italeri using the colours of the Italian flag for its distinctive logo.

Early Italaeri box-art

This kit was originally released way back in 1972 and I’d guess it must be one of the company’s earliest 1/35 AFVs. I was very much aware of Italeri kits when I was a model-mad kid back in the early seventies. They were attractively priced compared to Tamiya kits of the period and they seemed to cover lots of odd tanks and other vehicles I had never heard of though I didn’t get round to building many of them. So, when I saw this on Ebay for very little cash indeed, it seemed like too good an opportunity to miss.

Although this kit has been re-boxed many times since its initial release, as far as I know the tooling hasn’t changed though it does appear that there are two different versions; one with flexible, rubberised tracks and the other with hard, track-and-link tracks. I bought mine on Ebay from a private seller and it’s the track-and-link version.

As ever here on MKW, let’s take a look at this venerable, almost fifty-year-old kit and see if it’s any good…

History

The Marder was created as a make-shift, temporary solution to the inability of German armour to deal with tanks such as the T-34 encountered on the Eastern Front and the British Matilda in North Africa. It was clear that there was an urgent need for a self-propelled vehicle carrying a gun capable of destroying enemy armour. To save time, a new vehicle was designed to use captured or obsolete tank chassis to mount an effective anti-tank weapon.  

The first version of the Marder, the Marder I, used a 75 mm PaK-40 anti-tank gun, initially mounted on the chassis of a French  Tracteur Blindé 37L (Lorraine), an armoured personnel carrier of which hundreds of examples were captured during the invasion of France in 1940. Later Marder Is used the chassis from both the Hotchkiss H39 and FCM 36 light tanks, also captured in 1940. Around one hundred and seventy Marder Is were produced during 1942.

A Marder I

Image: Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Commons

However, as numbers of captured French vehicles dwindled, a new version of the Marder was produced, the Marder II which used the chassis from the obsolete Panzer II and mounted either a captured Russian 7.62 cm F-22 Model 1936 field gun modified to accept German anti-tank ammunition or, in later models, a standard 7.5 cm Pak 40. 

However, even Panzer II chassis became scarce and a final version of the Marder, the Marder III, was produced using the chassis from the obsolete Czech designed Panzer 38(t). Early versions (SdKfz 139) used the same captured Soviet 22 Model 1936 field gun as the Marder II, redesignated as the 7.62 cm PaK 36(r) in German use, but the later SdKfz 138 Ausf. H and Ausf. M used the  7.5 cm PaK 40. This is claimed to represent an early Marder III SdKfz 139 with the Russian 7.62 cm gun and a Czech 7.92mm machine gun (but, it isn’t). Almost three hundred and fifty examples of this model of the Marder were produced during 1942.

A Marder III in Russia in 1943

Image: Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Commons

All versions of the Marder featured an open-topped fighting compartment and a high silhouette which made them difficult to conceal on the battlefield. They also had relatively thin side and front armour which made them extremely vulnerable. Despite these issues, Marders served in Russia, North Africa, Sicily, Italy and Tunisia before being largely replaced by the superior Stug. III. However, Marders remained in service throughout the war on all fronts. 

Marder IIIs in Belgium, 1944

Image: Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Commons

What’s in the Box?

This box contains four sprues moulded in brown plastic, instructions and a small decal sheet.

Two of the four sprues are identical, with each providing the suspension, tracks and running gear for one side. The tracks seem to use the same track and link approach as I came across on a couple of Revell 1/72 kits, with single links and several complete lengths of varying length. This worked well on those smaller-scale kits and I’m hoping for similar results here.

Interestingly, there seem to be other versions of this kit with the same product number (6210) but that come with flexible, rubberised tracks and the wheels and suspension on a single sprue. I prefer these hard plastic tracks, so I’m happy, but if you find one of these, you may want to check which version you are buying. The Italeri website shows the version with rubberised tracks, but it also shows this kit as being discontinued, so, I’m not certain if mine is an older or a newer version.

There isn’t any obvious flash and not too many prominent seams or other moulding marks. Surface detail seems reasonable and the engraved panel lines and other detail doesn’t seem to be too overdone.

Two crew figures are provided and, at first glance, these don’t seem great. In particular, the creasing on their uniforms looks way overdone and rather clumsy. The Marder is a tiny vehicle and it would have been nice to have figures to give it scale, but I’m not sure I’ll bother with these.

The instructions look pretty straightforward and provide two colour schemes – one for a Marder of an Sp. AT Gun Co. of (I think) 2nd Panzer Division in Russia in 1942 and the other for a Marder of a unit in Normandy in 1944 (the decals seem to be for 23rd Panzer Division, but as that unit was not in France in 1944, I may be wrong).

The Russian Marder is shown in an overall finish of “Sandgelb” and the Normandy version also in Sandgelb overlaid with a camouflage pattern of Dunklegrun and Schokoladenbraun.    

Would You Want One?

First of all, there seems to be some doubt about what this kit actually represents. The most recent box described it as an “SdKfz 139 Panzerjäger Marder III,” which would mean it would have the Russian Model 1936 field gun. However, the pervious box, which used the same art, identified it as “Marder III Ausf. H.” which would make it a later SdKfz 138 equipped with the German 7.5 cm PaK 40. Looking at the kit, I think the gun modelled is the Pak 40, which makes this an SdKfz 138 Ausf. H, not an SdKfz139.  

Then there are the decals. These appear to include the markings of 23rd Panzer Division, though all the instructions say is that the tank to which these markings are to be applied is from “France – 1944,” but 23rd Panzer Division took no part in the fighting in the west and remained on the Eastern Front until it surrendered in 1945. If you care about such things, it looks as though these markings are wrong. The other decals, for a tank of 2nd Panzer Division in Russia in 1942, look OK.

The colours specified in the instructions are also, perhaps, suspect. From 1940, German tanks were painted in a base grey (dunkelgrau). From February 1943 this was replaced with a base of dark yellow (dunkelgelb), usually overlaid in the field with camoulage of brown and dark green. So, the colour scheme of overall Sandgelb (which I assume is the Italeri version of dunkelgelb) would not apply to a vehicle in Russia in 1942 which would have actually been finished in overall dunkelgrau. Perhaps I’m being a bit pedantic here, though I may use a dark grey paint when I build this kit representing a Marder in Russia in 1942.

There are only around 110 parts in this kit (excluding the crew figures) which means that interior detail is going to be very limited and there are no external stowage items at all – compare this to the DML Super Kit version which has five times as many parts and you’ll understand just how simplified this is! These things can be rectified with a bit or work but, compared to other 1/35 Marder III kits, this does look a little light on the kind of details we have come to expect from more recent kits in this scale.   

So, this isn’t the most detailed or complete Marder in 1/35 but, despite that, I’m rather looking forward to the build. As you probably know if you have read other posts here, I like older kits and kits that are fairly easy to build, and this fits the bill on both counts. I know what I’ll be doing in the evenings over the Festive break!

Alternatives

Tamiya do a rather nice 1/35 Marder III, first released in 2001. This kit seems to have gone through a number of iterations and the latest version is a Marder III Ausf. M Normandy Front. This is an upgraded version of this kit with over 260 parts including additional interior detail, link-and-track lengths and four rather nicely detailed figures.  

https://www.tamiya.com/english/products/35364/index.htm

DML also do a 1/35 Marder III Ausf. M. The basic kit is very nice indeed and it’s also available as a Smart Kit with PE parts and DMLs “magic-track.” The Smart Kit version has over 600 parts and, as you’d guess, the interior is nicely detailed and there are lots of bits and pieces included for stowage.

http://www.dragon-models.com/d-m-item.asp?pid=DRA6464

Links

Marder III on the Italeri web site

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